A Sojourner’s Tale, Part One of Two: Failed Utopias, Art, & Bourbon

I returned yesterday from a trip to Kentucky which is a state in the union that I generally have no business visiting but for the fact that my better half has some relatives that live in the bluegrass state.  All in all, it was pleasant and I was smart enough (this time) to document some of the trip via photography and I’m glad that I did so because there was some stuff worth documenting–always a bonus while on a trip.

First Stop: New Harmony, Indiana

For those of you, like me, who know nothing about the history of New Harmony, the trip is worth it just for the well-preserved 1800’s architecture which is juxtaposed with modern elements.  Everything from this:

to this:

The entirety of the site is a blend of the old and the new that capitalizes on the rich heritage of the town.  Basically, two individuals on two separate occassions came to New Harmony with the intent of creating communities based upon ambitious principles of social reform–aka utopias.  And like all good utopias, they failed miserably.  However, the legacy of their ideas has fostered a modern community that values the old and the new and offers a unique experience for any casual traveler.  Here are some more images from around New Harmony:

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If you happen to be in southern Indiana at some point in time, stop by.  The town can accommodate (like all good utopias) anybody’s spending power.  You can spend an afternoon walking around the sites and park areas for free or, if you rather, you can spend several hundred dollars in the little shops that dot the community–whatever floats your boat.

Next time: University of Kentuck Art Museum and the Bourbon Trail

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